Tag Archives: life

The Forest for the Trees: Doing What We Do Best

16 Jun
silhouette of a man during sunset

Photo by Johannes Plenio on Pexels.com

The Forest for the Trees: Doing What We Do Best

By Kathy Custren

 

The Forest for the Trees

Part of what intrigues me so about The Conundrum these days is that there are people, very good people, who have such a difficult time with discernment. Oh, vision clarity is not the issue. Unlike yours truly, many can see perfectly well without the aid of corrective lenses. But somewhere along the way, one’s visual acuity or ability to process what we see is called into question. We can describe it as not being able to see the forest for the trees.

Take the issue of life—a large topic, to be sure; but there are those of us who are unable to see the fullness of life. We may have many salient points about the sanctity of life and how important it is to live a good and virtuous life. In our zeal, we hit all the important points about how miraculous and precious it all is, but at some point after that, we fall off from truly committing to the full picture. We see the tree just fine, but not the forest in which it sits. In fact, there is probably a logging project going on not that far away. Forest for the trees, forest for the trees…we struggle with borders and boundaries on a regular basis, and while we tussle over these ill-defined lines, the sand shifts under our collective feet. We are at a point in time where we cannot avoid dealing with our collective consciousness in the forest that surrounds us. –And make no mistake, the other animals in the forest are watching our every move.

Why is it that we are unlikely to equate the taking of, by way of example, a potential human life, with as much gravity as we could the life of an existing tree? Do our rose-colored glasses need that much correction? Try as many do to argue the point, “but it’s only a tree,” a life is still a life, right? We feel pressed to provide rights to one type of life over another. Perhaps this is our problem—the stigma or prejudice we assign to life itself. We hold one type of existence differently than we do another, and this is what permits any number of atrocities to take place. Welcome to our world today.

 

Playing God, and Other Sundry Pastimes

You see, the issue is not in condemning or annihilating the forest, but in playing god…in thinking we have the right to pave the way—whether it be for profit or some other ‘way of being.’ Ultimately, we are taking one life for another, which is the condensed version of selectivity. As imperfect as we human beings are, where do we get off (a) taking life, (b) telling others they cannot take away life, or (c) enjoying the ability to create life in the first place?

The gods of yore (read your mythology) were keen on the entertainment aspects we puny humans once provided them, and probably still do. They are just a lot quieter now with their storytelling, seeing what their folly has wrought. And while on the supernatural topic of dimension and timelessness, we must remember the concept of reincarnation/karma, which speaks to the transformation of energy and the ability we will undoubtedly get to perfect ourselves if we so choose. We are so wrapped up in the physical that we tend to forget the spiritual aspects associated with being here…the forest for the trees, yet again.

So quick are we to point, ridicule, and stigmatize others, that we cannot see the forest ourselves. The interconnectedness we share whoosh! goes over our heads. The one planetary home on which we exist has cycles and timelines much greater than our own, and rather than paying attention to that story, we would much rather inflict our own narrow view. Bottom line, when we disrespect life it has a way of coming back around to haunt us, ultimately.

 

Into the Mix We Go—Now What?

Our forebears tried to warn us; they have left clues if we care to take notice. But, our collective visual problems come into focus yet again. We have trouble seeing correspondences within our own age, in active and real time, let alone thinking about ‘the past.’ We tend to leave such analysis to the history books that end up being rewritten to mask the atrocity of our impact on the planet. So, we should worry about ‘the future;’ and rightfully so. There is a shifting role of ‘the bad guy’ in the story—the antagonist—that should keep all of us on our toes. No matter what name we call that character, be it the devil, monster, disease, death, or any number of labels, we fear its presence and fight to overcome it, whatever “it” may be.

This fearsome, fighting mentality leads us to assign ‘war’ to just about everything, and look at us today. We have wars against drugs, crime, terror, “the other” or “the stranger,” and the labels go on. Forest for the trees again; as we are busy fighting wars, there is much collateral damage; so much for the sanctity of life. We tell ourselves that we are fighting a war to at least provide an excuse, as we drill down even further into the personal lives of people who, for a variety of ‘personal’ reasons, would choose to not let another life be born into this existence. Data drives the human machine as much as profits when it comes to caring: health care, life care, what is the real cost of the medicine that keeps us alive or that keeps the lights on at night? Suicide numbers are actively on the rise, so the choice point becomes crystal clear to many—and can we really blame them? Can we? When it is their choice between ‘this life’ and whatever takes place on the other side?

Hypocrisy aside, can we just let these people sit with the pain and reach that conclusion for themselves? Might we at least make the idea of simple existence a little less painful; perhaps cause a little less suffering? We are talking much more than just feeling an occasional pang of anxiousness here. Our collective pain reaches the level of our collective soul and cries out for attention. When we are unable to sleep at night, all of that suffering must go somewhere. If we really wanted to make a difference on a larger scale, why not target the bomb and weapons makers that annihilate entire swathes of living things off the face of the planet? Why choose instead to make life even more miserable for one who is carrying an unborn without the means to provide for it; or who come to our shore seeking asylum from even greater terror and death? We say we want to change lives, but am I and so many others missing the forest here? What support are we giving people who are here up to the point where pregnancy and one new life becomes a larger problem for “everybody?” Where is our humanity when one more hungry mouth to feed becomes unbearable? Nature has its own way of finding balance on a variety of levels, and let’s just contemplate that one a moment, shall we?

 

Social Media: Processing the Horrible

There is an overarching reason why social media is so consumer-driven. When we consider that we digest more than just nourishment, we cannot ignore the use of virtual reality to process some horrible things. For all those who avoid the internet like the plague, there may be some comfort in that; if not denial. For those of us who are online throughout the day, every day, we worry about the effects of over-consumption and how it might play on us psychologically. Plato’s cave? What is real and what is an illusion?

  • Fake news (from those ‘in charge’) to distract us from horrible changes; many of us would knowingly be in the streets…911…’false flags’…missiles on the way to Hawaii – an oops with deadly results.
  • We ‘elect’ people into positions of governance but fail to direct (provide feedback to) them; instead we get on social media and share memes and thoughts, thoughts and prayers, while few of us attempt to advocate for change or—heaven forbid—actively do something.

Social media goes beyond advertisement…we are not just sharing ideas on the newest restaurant in town or our favorite recipes or sports teams…we use it to process news on all levels, local, state, national, and international. Recent storm damages, wartime skirmishes, human trafficking, and animal poaching and abuse, all find space between the photos we share of our latest meal, Suzie’s school concert, or Uncle Joe’s traveling dart team. I am grateful for the ability of social media to bring us together and share ideas, so let us use this technology wisely. We must bring about great change if we really, really want to make this world a better place.

The way we all process the most horrible parts of our existence means that, in the midst of “all” the things that assail our senses, greater numbers, greater attention, greater energies are spent in managing our time and attention. Can we spend time better by being off the virtual reality and back in the real world and work? We must deal with both the offline and online versions of ourselves—the real and the spiritual combined—and what we bring into this world. So, time and change must apply to both.

 

What Price, Love? The Real Cost of Our Humanity

Is it me? I grew up under the now liberal(?) Christian notion of people loving one another, being a helper, and doing what we can to make the world a better place. So, seeing overwhelming inequality and suffering mixed in a culture of war and death does not sit very well with my psyche—how about yours? We know we can do better. I come from a time, not that far from this present moment, when people were taught to be kind to each other—where bullying, graft, and greed were seen as evils and faults to eschew rather than inspirational parts of our personality. It is not an ‘ego thing’ to care about others; in fact, we might say this lack of empathy is another human failing that we must address.

It goes beyond ‘to each his own,’ and if it means taking a hard look at what we call our borders and boundaries then let’s do that—maybe it is the right time? Here in the United States, I still like to think the founding fathers had it right—we either unite as one or we die alone. We are stronger together. The natural order does have us looking at the real cost of what it means to be a human alive today, and the price is as incalculable as the unspeakable name of God. Both were once revered and sacrosanct; today, both God and life are trivialized—both subjugated to the realm of control, and quite uncomfortable to wear.

When we lose sight of the forest, we also lose sight of its value. When we lose the knowledge that unites us, we separate like a rogue cancer cell might, enveloping and annihilating the health of the surrounding area and all within it. ‘As above, so below’ comes to mind. We have a collective body of pain and trauma to address and heal, and now is as good a time as any, timeless beings that we are.

Join with me in my fervent and daily prayer: Heaven help us, until we can help ourselves and each other.

 

Mother, Sister, Writer, Editor, Advocate, Optimizer, Cosmic Interpreter, and Devotee of Positivity, Kathy Custren writes about The Conundrum since 2007. Connect with “Consciousness Live” on WordPress and Facebook. With united hearts, let us move humanity forward.

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Clarity of Singularity

3 Aug

 

“To understand one thing well is better than understanding many things by halves.” 
–Johann Wolfgang von Goethe
 
“A jack-of-all-trades and a master at none.” — Unknown
 
The Conundrum tells us, in its own, unique way, that there is more to being one person. As confusing as that may sound, we can examine it to find that, even though we may be seen as one person with one set of features and senses, our experience is such that our “one” human package contains many gifts. Even if we have the ability to multi-task, there comes a time when we care and become mindful enough to focus on one activity at a time.
 
This sense of focused sight, this ability to see one site in the midst of chaos, is something that is a very strong, inherent trait. The facility of concentration is such that it not only causes us to sort out one tiny detail from many. It also causes us to concentrate our energies on that one task or search in order to experience all that there is to see…and be.
 
All that is contained may be considered to be an individualization; not unlike our own existence and experience. Being able to sense that there is an order to things that happens naturally can lead us to greater joy and freedom in life, as a matter of choice. When we take the time to do one thing and do it right, we learn that, despite duality and chaos, the ups and downs and other fluctuations, we can focus on doing one thing well–no matter what it is.
 
Many of us are called upon to do more than one thing at a time. Having two hands may be considered both a blessing and a curse. Wearing multiple hats at once, or taking on multiple responsibilities is a difficult skill to manage or sustain indefinitely. This kind of juggling can cause mistakes and imbalances to occur.
 
We soon learn that experience, maybe even being bold enough to call it positive experience, is best obtained through concentration. It is what the mystics of old tell us to do–to focus our energies. It is what safety experts tell us now when they warn us of the dangers of distracted driving.
 
Sure, we can do more things at once; however, it is a good thing to ask ourselves why we are doing that. Is it because we can, or because we need to? Are we too greedy to share the workload? Think about that a moment. Would we rather take on the stress of too much responsibility, leave something either partially or completely undone, than to focus simply on doing just one thing at a time?
 
Time always seems to be a factor to us here in this realm of existence, but what if it was not? What if we could flow with the idea of being timeless beings, who end up having all the time in the world that we might need to accomplish a task? Could we be comfortable with the role of playing ‘one small part’ in some greater design, understanding that we have opportunities to try again, or to do something over–and maybe better–in the process?
 
This is not to say we do not need a goal or deadline. The purpose of having a goal is to reach some eventual, desired outcome. We need not let go of a larger goal, such as having a peaceful world in our lifetime, or righting the wrongs we have inflicted upon the Earth. Deadlines are wonderful for reflecting on our accomplishments or making revisions.
 
Might we have a connection to a job, campaign, or some other effort–a shift change, perhaps–where we can appreciate its development and growth, facilitate that process, and achieve a sense of completion? Completion, without as much of the time-driven stress associated with a project’s steps along the way. Knowing a job is well done can be a rewarding feeling.
 
Understanding that we will get to a particular completion point provides a chance to breathe new life into the same project, or start another phase of existence. We learn that experience is concentrated energy. We have many opportunities at hand to unite and really make a difference to either change something or create something (a)new.
 
We can make aspects of our ‘one life’ better, without as much of the destruction that accompanies creation. Utilizing sustainable energy, whether it is our own human resource or some other part of our elemental experience, will help ensure continuation. We discover that using a finite resource only leads to a [dead] end.
 
The concept of manifestation and use of energies is more than pie-in-the-sky thinking or some woo-woo, magical mumbo-jumbo. It is no “secret,” since it is observable. Cosmically, there is a continuous motion and experience underway of which we are but one small fractal. We learn to either maneuver within the sphere of energy or get out of its way.
 
E pluribus Unum after all.

For our consideration. ~ Namaste ~ Blessings!

 
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